James Dacey at PhysicsWorld writes: ''Just a small number of bad referees can significantly undermine the ability of the peer-review system to select the best scientific papers. That is according to a pair of complex systems researchers in Austria who have modelled an academic publishing system and showed that human foibles can have a dramatic effect on the quality of published science. <!--break-->Stefan Thurner and Rudolf Hanel at the Medical University of Vienna set out to make an assessment of how the peer-review system might respond to incompetent refereeing.

We are currently offering a postdoctoral position to highly motivated and well-qualified young researchers who intend to enhance their scientific career in the field of ultracold atoms - mixtures fermionic quantum gases. The position is associated with the research group of Prof. Jook Walraven at the Van der Waals-Zeeman Institute of the University of Amsterdam. The appointed candidates could start at their earliest convenience.

Researchers describe how to carry out the first experimental test of string theory in a paper published tomorrow in Physical Review Letters.

String theory was originally developed to describe the fundamental particles and forces that make up our universe. The new research, led by a team from Imperial College London, describes the unexpected discovery that string theory also seems to predict the behaviour of entangled quantum particles. As this prediction can be tested in the laboratory, researchers can now test string theory.

Zeeya Merali at Nature News writes: ''Quantum hackers have performed the first 'invisible' attack on two commercial quantum cryptographic systems. By using lasers on the systems — which use quantum states of light to encrypt information for transmission — they have fully cracked their encryption keys, yet left no trace of the hack.

Submission deadline: 

Thursday, October 13, 2011

Quantum Information Processing (QIP) is a rapidly developing field of research spanning both physics and computer science. As the name implies, the field extends information processing (including computing and cryptography) to physical regimes where quantum effects become significant.

James Dacey at PhysicsWorld writes: ''Nanotechnology offers the promise of a new wave of sensors and optical components, but the tiny sizes involved can make it difficult for users to exchange information with these devices. Now, researchers in Spain have demonstrated a novel solution to this problem that involves fixing an "antenna" to nanoscale objects that can send and receive optical data with high precision.

The physics of quantum information team at the physics department of the Universite de Sherbrooke invites applications for up to four postdoctoral positions. The group is composed of four faculty members, Alexandre Blais, Michel Pioro-Ladrière, David Poulin, and Bertrand Reulet whose research interests cover both theoretical and experimental aspects of quantum information science and mesoscopic physics. The successful applicants will be involved in the group’s activities, which includes:

R. Colin Johnson at EE Times writes: ''Piezoelectric effects translate mechanical motion into electricity and vice versa, energizing a variety of electronic transducer applications as well as promising to cut power consumption in MEMS devices. Now McGill University researchers are harnessing the piezoelectric effect in quantum dots, aiming for nanoscale sensors and power supplies that translate vibration into a usable signal.

Submission deadline: 

Thursday, September 16, 2010

Registration deadline: 

Thursday, September 23, 2010

PQSM - Post-Quantum Security Models in Paris

In a post-quantum world, an eavesdropper is able to use quantum resources, possibly amounting to a large quantum computer, to process information. Thus, post-quantum attackers must be taken into account whenever security models and proofs are concerned, by both quantum and classical existing and future cryptosystems. And while we still do not know when, how or even whether we will enter a post-quantum era, there is already ground for common work between the quantum information and the cryptography community.

Belle Dumé at PhysicsWorld writes: ''Physicists in Germany have used fluorescence imaging to identify individual particles in an optical lattice for the first time. The breakthrough could allow researchers to create more advanced simulations of quantum phenomena and it might help in the quest for practical quantum computing.

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