We are looking for highly motivated candidates who have a strong research background in theoretical quantum optics, quantum information theory and/or condensed matter theory. The research to be undertaken will be in the interface of quantum optics and QIP with emphasis in the simulation of quantum many body effects. More specifically among others we would like to study how efficiently coupled cavity arrays, where each cavity is strongly interacting with atoms, can simulate quantum many-body effects usually occuring in condensed matter systems.

The silicon qubit group at the University of Wisconsin-Madison seeks applicants for two or more postdoctoral positions, beginning in 2009. The goal of our group is to develop quantum dot spin qubits in silicon heterostructures. The open positions would provide theoretical support for this effort. Candidates should demonstrate expertise in one or more of the following areas: condensed matter theory, quantum information theory and applications (e.g., qubit simulations), and semiconductor device theory and modeling.

Application deadline: 
Sunday, February 1, 2009

Two years ago researchers at Duke University in the US unveiled the first “invisibility cloak” — a device that can make objects vanish from sight, at least when viewed using a narrow band of microwave frequencies. Now, Ulf Leonhardt of St Andrew’s University in the UK and Tomás Tyc of Masaryk University in the Czech Republic have come up with a new way of using mathematics to describe a invisibility cloak (Science DOI: 10.1126/science.1166332).

CIFAR’s Quantum Information Processing Program is seeking outstanding researchers to fill two Junior Fellow positions (i.e., postdoctoral fellowships). The Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR) is a catalyst for discovery, incubating ideas that revolutionize the international research community. The Quantum Information Processing (QIP) Program studies a wide range of topics relating to quantum information, including experimental and theoretical physics, theoretical computer science, and mathematical aspects of quantum information.

Application deadline: 
Tuesday, December 9, 2008

The entanglement of quantum bits (or qubits) is what should allow quantum computers to perform certain calculations much faster than the computers we use today. But now, physicists in Germany and Canada are saying that most qubits could be “too entangled” to be of any use in quantum computers.

Applications are invited for a postdoctoral position in the solid state quantum computing theory group at University at Buffalo, SUNY. The nominal starting time is September 2009, although earlier starting time is possible. Current research interests within the group include decoherence of multi-qubit systems, entanglement through a spin bus, coherent control of a spin bus, and entanglement and quantum correlations near quantum phase transitions.

Application deadline: 
Saturday, January 31, 2009

The Quantum Information Processing (QIP) Group is based in HP Labs Bristol UK, and is part of the Information and Quantum Systems Laboratory (IQSL). The QIP group is seeking applicants for a fixed-term research appointment for two years, to work on the next stages of the implementation of "consumer quantum key distribution", HP's most advanced quantum information technology. The appointee will carry out research and development on short-range, free-space QKD for consumer applications.

Application deadline: 
Saturday, November 29, 2008

The Quantum Information Processing (QIP) Group is based in HP Labs Bristol UK, and is part of the Information and Quantum Systems Laboratory (IQSL). The QIP group is seeking applicants for two fixed-term research appointments (each for two years), to work on theoretical aspects of few-qubit applications and hybrid quantum information processing, leading to new technologies based on quantum information.

Application deadline: 
Saturday, November 29, 2008

On his blog Bruce Schneier writes "I'm always in favor of security research, and I have enjoyed following the developments in quantum cryptography. But as a product, it has no future. It's not that quantum cryptography might be insecure; it's that cryptography is already sufficiently secure."

Researchers in China and Europe have entangled a record-breaking 10 quantum bits — an important breakthrough in the quest to develop practical quantum computers.