We are pleased to inform that Quantiki has a new functionality. We introduce Quantiki Video Abstracts - a place where you can upload video abstracts of your papers. If you want to promote your paper just make a short video in which you introduce it and upload it on Quantiki and share it with Quantum Information community. You can also subscribe YouTube channel with Quantiki video abstracts.

Scientists in the UK and US have shown how to increase photovoltaic efficiencies by attaching nanocrystal quantum dots to patterned semiconductor layers. The approach exploits the phenomenon of non-radiative energy transfer and could, say the researchers, lead to a new generation of more efficient solar cells.

HP Labs - Post-Doctoral Researcher in Experimental QKD

The Quantum Information Processing (QIP) Group is based in HP Labs Bristol UK, and is part of the Information and Quantum Systems Laboratory (IQSL). The QIP group is seeking applicants for a fixed-term research appointment for two years, to work on the next stages of the implementation of "consumer quantum key distribution", HP's most advanced quantum information technology. The appointee will carry out research and development on short-range, free-space QKD for consumer applications.

Application deadline: 
Thursday, March 19, 2009

Quantum computation was a highly speculative enterprise facing serious technological obstacles until a shy young physicist came along. Dave Bacon tells the story of Alexei Kitaev’s big idea. Read more at PhysicsWorld.

Physicists have teleported quantum information between two atoms separated by a significant distance, for the first time. Until now this feat had only been achieved between photons, and between two nearby atoms through the intermediary action of a third. “Our system has the potential to form the basis for a large-scale ‘quantum repeater’ that can network quantum memories over vast distances” said group leader Christopher Munroe of the University of Maryland.

We're setting up a small Quantiki Workshop!!! If you're interested in getting to know the team, learning more about how Quantiki works, or would like to contribute and work with us - why don't you come along? It is also a good time to tell us how we could improve Quantiki or develope some new ideas and directions for this international non-profit project. Get back to us through the contact form at the top of this page!

Queen's University Belfast

This post is available for 5 years to undertake research in the broad area of Quantum Information Theory including quantum optics, fundamental issues in quantum information processing, and cold atom physics which can complement and strengthen the existing research within the Centre for Theoretical Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics. The candidate is also expected to contribute to teaching in the Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics teaching division, and to undertake administrative duties as assigned.

Application deadline: 
Thursday, February 5, 2009

We are looking for highly motivated candidates who have a strong research background in theoretical quantum optics, quantum information theory and/or condensed matter theory. The research to be undertaken will be in the interface of quantum optics and QIP with emphasis in the simulation of quantum many body effects. More specifically among others we would like to study how efficiently coupled cavity arrays, where each cavity is strongly interacting with atoms, can simulate quantum many-body effects usually occuring in condensed matter systems.

The silicon qubit group at the University of Wisconsin-Madison seeks applicants for two or more postdoctoral positions, beginning in 2009. The goal of our group is to develop quantum dot spin qubits in silicon heterostructures. The open positions would provide theoretical support for this effort. Candidates should demonstrate expertise in one or more of the following areas: condensed matter theory, quantum information theory and applications (e.g., qubit simulations), and semiconductor device theory and modeling.

Application deadline: 
Sunday, February 1, 2009

Two years ago researchers at Duke University in the US unveiled the first “invisibility cloak” — a device that can make objects vanish from sight, at least when viewed using a narrow band of microwave frequencies. Now, Ulf Leonhardt of St Andrew’s University in the UK and Tomás Tyc of Masaryk University in the Czech Republic have come up with a new way of using mathematics to describe a invisibility cloak (Science DOI: 10.1126/science.1166332).