ID Quantique SA announced the successful completion of the longest running project for testing Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) in a field environment. The main goal of the SwissQuantum network, installed in the Geneva metropolitan area in March 2009, was to validate the reliability and robustness of QKD in continuous operation over a long time period in a field environment. The quantum layer ran stably for nearly 2 years until the completion of the project in January 2011, confirming the viability of QKD as a commercial encryption technology.

PhD Positions in Many-Body Theory of Ultra-cold Atoms

Center for Optical Quantum Technologies, University of Hamburg, Germany

We offer three PhD positions, available immediately, at the newly created Center for Optical Quantum Technologies (ZOQ). In a vibrant, communicative environment, we study a wide range of quantum phenomena, from technological aspects of ultra-cold atom systems to fundamental questions of many-body theory. We use both analytical approaches, e.g. field-theoretic descriptions, as well as numerical methods, such as simulations.

Dates: 
Wednesday, August 31, 2011
Submission deadline: 
Thursday, June 16, 2011
Registration deadline: 
Thursday, June 2, 2011

The symposium is intended to intensify the link between the basic research areas of photonics and atomic ensembles. Leading scientists in the fields of quantum communication protocols, quantum memory and quantum repeaters, atomic ensembles, Rydberg atoms and photonic QIP will discuss new promising approaches to quantum information and communication technologies and their physical challenges.

APPLICATIONS FOR THIS POSITION ARE NOW CLOSED.

PhD/postdoc positions in quantum information and the foundations of quantum theory.

Application deadline: 
Sunday, July 10, 2011

John Matson at his Scientific American blog write: ''Quantum information science is a bit like classroom management—the larger the group, the harder it is to keep everything together. But to build a practical quantum computer physicists will need many particles working in synchrony as quantum bits, or quibits. <!--break-->Each qubit can be a 0 and a 1 simultaneously, vaulting the number-crunching power of a hypothetical quantum computer well past that of ordinary computers.