The new group of Prof. Stefan Kuhr at the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, invites applications for a Postdoc position. The research project focuses on single-site imaging and manipulation of ultracold atoms in optical lattices. These novel techniques will be used for quantum simulation of strongly correlated many-body systems and for scalable quantum information processing. More information can be found at http://phys.strath.ac.uk/information/acadstaff/stefan.kuhr.php and by contacting Stefan Kuhr.

Dates: 
Saturday, September 17, 2011
Registration deadline: 
Wednesday, June 29, 2011

This School will feature tutorial style lectures introducing themes of broad interest in the areas of quantum gases, quantum optics and condensed matter physics from the ultracold atom perspective, providing a basis for new members of the community and deepening the knowledge of more experienced ones. Additional shorter seminar style talks will give a flavour of current trends in the field. All lectures will be given by leading scientists from around the world, but participants are strongly encouraged to present and discuss their own research, especially during a dedicated poster session.

The most accurate quantum measurements possible are made using an interferometer, which exploits the wave nature of matter and light. In this method, two identical beams of particles are sent along different paths to a detector, with one interacting with an object of interest along the way. Recombining the beams afterwards creates an interference pattern that reflects how much the interacting beam was disturbed -providing details about the object's properties.

Scientists of the Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information (IQOQI) in Innsbruck, Austria, have reached a milestone in the exploration of quantum gas mixtures. In an international first, the research group led by Rudolf Grimm and Florian Schreck has succeeded in producing controlled strong interactions between two fermionic elements -lithium-6 and potassium-40. This model system not only promises to provide new insights into solid-state physics but also shows intriguing analogies to the primordial substance right after the Big Bang.

Dates: 
Saturday, July 2, 2011
Submission deadline: 
Sunday, May 1, 2011

DCM 2011 is the seventh in a series of international workshops focusing on new computational models. It aims to bring together researchers who are currently developing new computational models or new features of a traditional one. The goal of DCM is to foster interaction, to provide a forum for presenting new ideas and work in progress, and to enable newcomers to learn about current activities in this area. DCM 2011 will be a one-day satellite event of ICALP 2011 in Zurich, Switzerland.
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