2010 Postdoc Recruitment

Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics invites applications for postdoctoral positions in the areas of quantum gravity, string theory, quantum information, cosmology, quantum foundations and particle physics. We will consider applications in all of these areas. Exceptional applicants in related areas, such as condensed matter physics, are encouraged to apply. The postdoctoral positions are normally for a period of three years. Outstanding candidates may also be considered for a senior postdoctoral position with a five-year term.

According to PhysicsWorld researchers from the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil and Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Erlangen, Germany have added another capability to the quantum computing toolkit by being the first to show that light beams of three different wavelengths can be entangled. This achievement could provide a way to create three-way optical communication links between elements of a quantum computer. This result was published in the recent issue of Science magazine.

POST-DOCTORAL RESEARCH ASSOCIATE: QUANTUM INFORMATION THEORY

Department of Pure Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics

Salary: £27,183-£35,469 pa

Limit of Tenure applies*

The Statistical Laboratory of the Department (see http://www.statslab.cam.ac.uk/) invites applications for a post-doctoral research associate to commence on 1st January 2010 or later by negotiation. The successful candidate will be associated also with the Centre for Quantum Computation (CQC) of the University of Cambridge (see http://qubit.damtp.cam.ac.uk/).

Quantum cryptography is a promising new way to send encrypted information. This new technology does suffer from some drawbacks. One of the toughest problems is the range that information can be sent is limited to around 50-100 km. Advancements have been underway. The most promising advancement is being working on by a team based out of the Australian National University. They found a way to store and manipulate photons to be used as a memory device.

<p>According to Physics World researchers at the University of Bristol, UK have made a prototype optical quantum computer chip and used it to perform a mathematical calculation. The device consists of tiny silica waveguides on a silicon chip and carries out a version of the quantum calculation known as Shor's algorithm. The result is an important step towards making practical, real-world quantum computers.</p>
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